Electives

Students in the On-Campus/Online Master of Public Health program usually take electives during their final semester.


Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response

PH W257 (3 units)

With government-imposed disaster readiness regulations impacting health care across the country, emergency preparedness is a crucial issue for public health practitioners today. This course is designed to provide training and education on public health preparedness and response to large-scale emergencies and disasters.  Students will be provided with an introduction to the knowledge, skills, capabilities, and behaviors required for competency in public health preparedness and emergency response. This course will build upon and reinforce basic public health skills and knowledge in epidemiology and biostatistics as we explore surveillance, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery from natural and man-made emergency events. In the course, students will become familiar with the major categories and classification of disaster events, including weapons of mass destruction. Other course topics include how the public health system integrates with the National Response Plan and Framework to ensure effective preparedness and response to large-scale emergencies and disasters. Students will learn how to conduct a Hazard Assessment to determine community vulnerabilities. Students will learn how to develop, implement and evaluate public health emergency preparedness and response plans. To further familiarize themselves with the U.S. National Response Framework, students will complete (no-cost) online FEMA Independent Study Programs for Incident Command System (ICS) certification. These certifications are generally required for employment in the field of public health emergency preparedness.

Your Instructor: Robyn Gershon, Ph.D.

Dr. Gershon is an interdisciplinary scientist working in the field of occupational and environmental health. She is an adjunct professor at the Center for Occupational and Environmental Health at UC Berkeley and an affiliated faculty member of Berkeley’s Center for Infectious Diseases & Emergency Readiness. Her research focuses on three major areas: high risk work settings and work occupations, disaster preparedness and occupational health, and the translation of epidemiological research findings into organizational practices and regulatory control.

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Public Health Aspects of Maternal and Child Nutrition

PH W206 (3 units)

Nutrition plays a vital role in human reproduction and child growth and development. This course provides an overview of the major nutritional issues faced infants, children, adolescents and reproductive age women in the United States. There is one module on malnutrition that has global content. The course reviews programs and interventions aimed at improving MCH nutrition and builds student familiarity with evidence based MCH nutrition practice guidelines. The course demonstrates a methodology for applying this knowledge to food choices at a personal and programmatic level. Students will also be asked to engage in a ‘hands on’ experience with the USA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly The Food Stamp Program). Supplemental learning activities for this course are highly interactive.

Your Instructor: Cindy Leung, Sc.D., M.P.H.

Cindy Leung is a postdoctoral scholar in the Center for Health and Community in the School of Medicine at UCSF. She received her M.P.H. from UC Berkeley School of Public Health and her Sc.D. in Nutrition and Epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health, with concentrations in public health nutrition and cardiovascular epidemiology.

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Strategic Management and the Health Sector

PH W223 (3 units)

This course is designed to assist you in developing leadership skills involving strategic planning, analysis, and implementation. Emphasis is placed upon the leader’s role in simultaneously taking into account a wide variety of internal and external factors to improve organization and system performance in meeting the health needs of individuals and communities. Particular attention is given to the importance of developing and implementing innovative strategies and the process of innovation itself. Students are expected to have had at least one course dealing with the health care system or relevant work-related experience. Students are required to have general background knowledge of the health system.

Your Professor: Joseph Houska, Ph.D.

Dr. Houska received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Yale University and taught at Boston University, Stanford University, and UC Berkeley before he began his 34-year career in the health sector, with Blue Cross of California and Kaiser Permanente where he worked in market research, financial forecasting, organizational design, strategic planning, and performance improvement.

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Global Health Disaster Preparedness and Response

PH W258 (3 units)

This course is designed to serve as a guide to the complex and interdisciplinary emerging field of global disaster management. Students from a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds with an interest in global disaster management will be introduced to the four phases of the modern disaster management paradigm that currently guide planning and response: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Course topics include the historical perspective of past mega-disasters; global disaster trends; hazard identification, profiling and analysis; concepts of risk and vulnerability and risk evaluation; structural and non-structural mitigation; multi-level disaster preparedness; pre-, peri-, and post-disaster response, including the provision of water, food, and shelter, and the management of volunteers; components of recovery, disaster effects on communities and societies; participation of governmental, non-governmental , and multilateral agencies and organizations in planning and response; and special topics, including issue of donor fatigue, political will, state sovereignty, humanitarian assistance and role of the media, including social media. Students will be provided with an introduction to the knowledge, skills, capabilities, and behaviors required for competency in global health preparedness and emergency response. This course will build upon and reinforce basic public health skills and knowledge in epidemiology and biostatistics as we explore the four phases of global disaster management. This global course is focused on a broad international perspective, although the US and the US disaster management system continue to play an important role in response to catastrophes that occur throughout the world.

Your Instructor: Robyn Gershon, Ph.D.

Dr. Gershon is an interdisciplinary scientist working in the field of occupational and environmental health. She is an adjunct professor at the Center for Occupational and Environmental Health at UC Berkeley and an affiliated faculty member of Berkeley’s Center for Infectious Diseases & Emergency Readiness. Her research focuses on three major areas: high risk work settings and work occupations, disaster preparedness and occupational health, and the translation of epidemiological research findings into organizational practices and regulatory control.

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Infectious Diseases

PH W260 (3 units)

Infectious diseases remain a major public health and clinical concern worldwide. The more than 1400 different infectious diseases recognized today are distinct from most others because they affect all human organ systems and contribute to the burden of many other types of disease, including non-communicable and chronic diseases. New infectious diseases emerge every few years—more than 175 just in the last 30 years. Hence, concepts, approaches, and management of infectious diseases constantly evolve. Of course, it is not possible to cover every aspect of >1400 infectious diseases in 7 weeks. This course will emphasize basic concepts and principles of infectious diseases as they relate to public health. It is designed to provide a general approach and framework through which all infectious disease problems can be addressed. In this way, at the end of this course, each student will have learned to independently address topics not covered in class using these approaches and framework.

Your Instructors: Lee Riley, M.D. and John Swartzberg, M.D., FACP

Dr. Riley is Professor and Chair, Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology at the University of California, Berkeley. He directs UC Berkeley’s Global Health Equity Scholars program of the Fogarty International Center. He is a physician who teaches and conducts research on infectious diseases and public health. His research interests include molecular epidemiology of infectious diseases and bacterial pathogenesis, as well as field epidemiology and global health, with a focus on informal urban settlements.

Dr. Swartzberg is a clinical professor, emeritus at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health. He is the Chair of the Editorial Board of the UC Berkeley Wellness Letter and past director of the UC Berkeley – UCSF Joint Medical Program. Board certified in internal medicine and infectious diseases, he spent 26 years in clinical practice before joining UC Berkeley’s faculty in 2001. He is also the hospital epidemiologist and Chair of the Infection Control Committee at Alta Bates Medical Center in Berkeley.

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Outbreak Investigation

PH W253 (3 units)

This course will provide students with an overview of how to conduct an outbreak investigation in public health. This course will teach students why and how clusters of illnesses/epidemics are investigated. Methods and approaches required for such investigations will be discussed in detail, using published and unpublished material from the scientific literature. Specifically, the course will cover (1) the basic concepts of outbreak investigations, (2) developing case definitions and case finding, (3) the role of the laboratory, (4) the importance of public health surveillance, (5) descriptive epidemiology of outbreak data, (6) developing and testing hypotheses, and (7) communication of results from outbreak investigations.

Your Instructors: Wayne Enanoria, Ph.D., M.P.H. and Art Reingold, M.D.

Wayne Enanoria received a Bachelor’s degree in Molecular and Cell Biology with an emphasis in Neurobiology, an M.P.H. in Epidemiology/Biostatistics and a Ph.D. in Epidemiology from the UC Berkeley. He has worked as an epidemiologist and research analyst in local and state agencies including the San Francisco Department of Public Health and the California Department of Public Health at the Office of AIDS, the Reproductive Epidemiology Section and the Immunization Branch.
Read more about this instructor.

Dr. Reingold is a lecturer and head of epidemiology. His current research interests include prevention of transmission of HIV in developing countries, the intersection of the HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis epidemics, malaria in Uganda, emerging and re-emerging infections in the US and globally, sexual transmission of hepatitis C virus, vaccine-preventable diseases, and respiratory infections in childhood.

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Health Care Organization and Management

PH W224

Gain an introduction to the active theories and perspectives in management and organizational theory. You will gain a solid comprehension of a diverse set of frameworks and theories relevant to understanding healthcare delivery and public health organizations. Some of the key learning objectives and competencies include:

    • Learning how to effectively manage the complex demands and arrangements in healthcare and public health organizations
    • Leveraging a diverse set of frameworks and theories to understand how healthcare organizations work
    • Understanding the dynamics of teams and how to improve their performance

Your Co-Professor: Hector Rodriguez, Ph.D., MPH

Dr. Rodriguez is associate professor of health policy and management, associate director of the new Center for Healthcare Organizational and Innovation Research (CHOIR), and chair of the Ph.D. Program in Health Services and Policy Analysis at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health. His expertise is in organizational analysis and performance measurement in health care delivery and local public health systems. He has published extensively on the measurement of patient care experiences and the impact of delivery system interventions on patient outcomes, including the impact of performance-based financial incentives on primary care quality. Dr. Rodriguez is a board member of the Davita Healthcare Partners Institute for Applied Research and Education, the Academy Health Article-of-the-Year selection committee, and is a technical advisor to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for their research portfolio focused on systems and services research. He received his doctorate in health policy/medical sociology from Harvard University and his MPH in health policy and administration from University of California, Berkeley.

Your Co-Professor: John Myovich, M.B.A.

John Myovich is a Managing Director of Performance Excellence at Kaiser Permanente and a Lecturer at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health. His expertise is in performance improvement, financial analysis, strategy and planning. He has led several major initiatives in the area of performance management, hospital efficiency, quality, continuum of care, service delivery planning as well as technology implementations (electronic medical record). Throughout his career, he has taught a variety of health care and finance classes at Kaiser Permanente and externally at the International Business College, San Francisco and UC Berkeley, Haas School of Business. He received an M.B.A. in Finance from California State University, East Bay and Executive Leadership Program degree from the University of North Carolina, Kenan-Flagler.

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